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An Architectural Model: Remembrance of the First Homesteads

When the National District of Freedmen’s Town was designated in 1984, there were 530 Contributing National Register structures. Now there are fewer than 20. In order to recreate a visual sense of the historic landscape, architecture student interns Chris Cooper, Xavier Spencer, and Alex John (under the guidance of the Prairie View A&M University College of Architecture, and Dr. Joseph Goldman and Monica Rokicki of the International Center for the Solution of Environmental Problems (ICSEP) researched and constructed a historically correct replica of a portion of the 40-block National Historic District of Freedmen’s Town.

Using detailed historical research, painstaking measurements, and professional architectural model-making techniques, this model was completed and subsequently exhibited at the Museum of Printing History, at Prairie View A & M University, and will be shown at Chase Bank in downtown Houston in the near future. This precise, beautiful architectural model is an excellent visual interpretation of the fine urban planning aesthetic, as well as the construction skills of the founding families when they created their community in mid 1800. The interns also began architectural documentation of the Rev. Pullum house in preparation for its restoration.

This Preservation/Architecture Internship was made possible through generous grants from the John D. McGovern Fund, the Albert and Ethel Herzstein Charitable Foundation, and the Bayer Corporation.

 

When the National District of Freedmen’s Town was designated in 1984, there were 530 Contributing National Register structures. Now there are fewer than 20. In order to recreate a visual sense of the historic landscape, architecture student interns Chris Cooper, Xavier Spencer, and Alex John (under the guidance of the Prairie View A&M University College of Architecture, and Dr. Joseph Goldman and Monica Rokicki of the International Center for the Solution of Environmental Problems (ICSEP) researched and constructed a historically correct replica of a portion of the 40-block National Historic District of Freedmen’s Town.

Using detailed historical research, painstaking measurements, and professional architectural model-making techniques, this model was completed and subsequently exhibited at the Museum of Printing History, at Prairie View A & M University, and will be shown at Chase Bank in downtown Houston in the near future. This precise, beautiful architectural model is an excellent visual interpretation of the fine urban planning aesthetic, as well as the construction skills of the founding families when they created their community in mid 1800. The interns also began architectural documentation of the Rev. Pullum house in preparation for its restoration.

This Preservation/Architecture Internship was made possible through generous grants from the John D. McGovern Fund, the Albert and Ethel Herzstein Charitable Foundation, and the Bayer Corporation.